2018 Summer Reading Assignments

All English classes require summer reading.  Please find the course(s) in which you are enrolled and read the selections indicated. You are responsible for having the book(s) read by the first day of school. 

Please annotate your summer reading novel(s), using the guide, and include handwritten comments with your underlining or highlighting.  Please also print out and complete the graphic organizer (Handwrite your quotations and interpretations. Do not type.).  Bring your annotations and graphic organizers to class on the first day of school.  If you are assigned two summer reading books, please complete the annotations and graphic organizer for both books.

Your teacher will assign an evaluation based on your reading and appropriate to the course during the first week of school, and/or during a summer reading unit during the first two weeks of school. You will be graded.
 

List of 13 frequently asked questions.

  • 9th Grade Literature and Composition 101

    Annotations and Quotation Analysis for Joy Luck Club
    (Summer Reading- Literature and Composition 101- Grade 9)

    Directions: Make annotations for The Joy Luck Club based on the following categories:

    Literature and Composition 101
    must have at least three (3) annotations for each category and a total of 20 or more that span the entire novel. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.
     
    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

    1) Political factors
    : How do political factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Political factors might include forms of government, wars, revolutions, ideologies (beliefs about how people and governments should work and live)
     
    2) Social factors: How do social factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Social factors might include family expectations about success, marriage, children, friendship, and other interpersonal relationships
     
    3) Economic Factors: How do economic factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Economic factors might include the wealth or poverty of a country, a family, and/or an individual
     
    4) Religious Factors: How do religious factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Religious factors might include beliefs or disbeliefs about the ultimate meaning of life, or a person or people's participation in and belonging to a specific faith community, including shared beliefs (i.e. Jesus is Lord and Savior) and accompanying practices (prayer, helping the poor, etc.)
     
    5) Geographic factors: How do geographic factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Geographic factors might include how the land, whether mountains, rivers, oceans, and so forth, affects how people think or what people believe, people's ability to move from one place to another, and/or people's ability to get the resources they need to live.
    Important note: While it is convenient to separate these factors into the categories listed here, it is important to remember that they overlap and are all intricately connected.

    6) Figurative Language and Literary Devices: Figurative language in literature is not simply decorative or fancy writing. It connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way. 

    Describe/define the following devices and find two examples of each in the text:
    • Metaphor
    • Simile
    • Personification
    • Imagery
    Helpful Videos for Annotating:

    If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating

    Assessment
    :
    • Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
    Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.
  • 9th Grade Literature and Composition 151

    Annotations and Quotation Analysis for Joy Luck Club
    (Summer Reading- Literature and Composition 151- Grade 9)

    Students in this class are required to read 2 novels and complete annotations and graphic organizers for both. Specific directions for each novel are listed below.

    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

    Directions
    : Make annotations for The Joy Luck Club based on the following categories:

    Literature and Composition 151
    must have at least five (5) annotations for each category and a total of 35 that span the entire novel. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.

    1) Political factors: How do political factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Political factors might include forms of government, wars, revolutions, ideologies (beliefs about how people and governments should work and live)
     
    2) Social factors: How do social factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Social factors might include family expectations about success, marriage, children, friendship, and other interpersonal relationships
     
    3) Economic Factors: How do economic factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Economic factors might include the wealth or poverty of a country, a family, and/or an individual
     
    4) Religious Factors: How do religious factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Religious factors might include beliefs or disbeliefs about the ultimate meaning of life, or a person or people's participation in and belonging to a specific faith community, including shared beliefs (i.e. Jesus is Lord and Savior) and accompanying practices (prayer, helping the poor, etc.)
     
    5) Geographic factors: How do geographic factors affect the characters in the novel?
    • Geographic factors might include how the land, whether mountains, rivers, oceans, and so forth, affects how people think or what people believe, people's ability to move from one place to another, and/or people's ability to get the resources they need to live.
    Important note: While it is convenient to separate these factors into the categories listed here, it is important to remember that they overlap and are all intricately connected.

    6) Figurative Language and Literary Devices: Figurative language in literature is not simply decorative or fancy writing. It connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way. 
    Describe/define the following devices and find two examples of each in the text:
    • Metaphor
    • Simile
    • Personification
    • Imagery
     
    For the Choice book, you will annotate and create a graphic organizer. Focus on themes, figurative language, literary devices, characters, symbols, and any other information that you find valuable in helping you better understand the novel. You must have more than 30 annotations that span the entire novel.

    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

    Choose one other
    ISBN: 978-0486454016 Dracula by Bram Stoker (mystery/horror)
    ISBN: 978-0374531263 A Long Way Gone, by Ishmael Beah (memoir)
     
    Helpful Videos for Annotating:

    If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating

    Assessment
    :
    Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
    • Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.

  • 10th Grade British Literature 202 

    Annotations and Quotation Analysis for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime
    (Summer Reading- British Literature 202 - Grade 10)

    Directions
    : Make annotations for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime based on the following categories:

    British Literature 202:
    must have at least three (3) annotations for each category and a total of 20 that span the entire novel. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.

    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

    1        Relationships:
    • Relationships with: His dad, Mom, Friends, school, neighbors, the dog, and anything else.
    2        Language and Communication
    • How does the main character communicate or not with others?
    3        Keeping Life in Order
    • How does the main character try to keep order in his life?
    4        Lying and Telling the Truth
    • Find examples of these ideas in the story
    5        Investigations
    • How does the main character investigate the murder?
    6        Behavior
    • How does the main character act or behave in the story?
    Important note: While it is convenient to separate these factors into the categories listed here, it is important to remember that they overlap and are all intricately connected.

    7       
    Figurative Language and Literary Devices: Figurative language in literature connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way. There are plenty of examples in the book.
     
    • Metaphor
    • Simile
    • Personification
    • Imagery
    Helpful Videos for Annotating:

    If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating
     
    Assessment:
    Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
    • Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.
  • 10th Grade British Literature 252

    Annotations and Quotation Analysis for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime
    (Summer Reading- British Literature 252 - Grade 10)

    Students in this class are required to read 2 novels and complete annotations and graphic organizers for both. Specific directions for each novel are listed below.

    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

    Directions
    : Make annotations for The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime based on the following categories:

    British Literature 252:
    must have at least five (5) annotations for each category and a total of 35 that span the entire novel. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.

    1        Relationships:
    • Relationships with: His dad, Mom, Friends, school, neighbors, the dog, and anything else.
    2        Language and Communication
    • How does the main character communicate or not with others?
    3        Keeping Life in Order
    • How does the main character try to keep order in his life?
    4        Lying and Telling the Truth
    • Find examples of these ideas in the story
    5        Investigations
    • How does the main character investigate the murder?
    6        Behavior
    • How does the main character act or behave in the story?
    Important note: While it is convenient to separate these factors into the categories listed here, it is important to remember that they overlap and are all intricately connected.

    7       
    Figurative Language and Literary Devices: Figurative language in literature connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way. There are plenty of examples in the book.
     
    • Metaphor
    • Simile
    • Personification
    • Imagery
     For the Choice book, you will annotate and create a graphic organizer. Focus on themes, figurative language, literary devices, characters, symbols, and any other information that you find valuable in helping you better understand the novel. You must have more than 30 annotations that span the entire novel.

    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

    Choose One other
    • ISBN: 978-0451524935 1984 George Orwell
    • ISBN: 978-0547928227The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien
     
    Helpful Videos for Annotating:

    If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating

    Assessment
    :
    Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
    • Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.
  • 11th Grade American Literature 303

    Annotations and Quotation Analysis for Their Eyes Were Watching God
    (Summer Reading- American Literature 303- Grade 11)

    Directions: Make annotations for Their Eyes Were Watching God based on the following categories:

    American Literature 303
    must have at least three (3) annotations for each category and a total of 20 that span the entire novel. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.

    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

    Themes:
    (annotate these where you see them)
    1) Search for Self:
    • struggles to discover what will bring true happiness
    2) Language and meaning/findings one’s voice
    • Language and speaking gives a person status and membership in a community.
    3) Race and Racism
    • Class differences within the African-American community
    4) The Journey
    • Discover the Journey of the main character
    Symbols: (annotate these when you see them)
     
    1. Nature: pear tree, sun, hurricane, etc.
    2. Clothing and hair: represents a quest for identity/individuality
    3. Gateways: the need for freedom
    4. Porches: gathering and community
    Important note: While it is convenient to separate these factors into the categories listed here, it is important to remember that they overlap and are all intricately connected.

    Figurative Language and Literary Devices:
    Figurative language in literature is not simply decorative or fancy writing. It connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way.

    Describe/define the following devices and find two examples of each in the text:
    • Metaphor
    • Simile
    • Personification
    • Imagery
    Helpful Videos for Annotating:

    If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating

    Assessment
    :
    Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
    • Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.
  • 11th Grade American Literature 353

    Annotations and Quotation Analysis for Their Eyes Were Watching God
    (Summer Reading- American Literature- Grade 11)

    Students in this class are required to read 2 novels and complete annotations and graphic organizers for both. Specific directions for each novel are listed below.

    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

    Directions
    : Make annotations for Their Eyes Were Watching God based on the following categories:

    American Literature 353
    must have at least five (5) annotations for each category and a total of 35 that span the entire novel. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.

    Themes:
    (annotate these where you see them)

    1) Search for Self:
    • struggles to discover what will bring true happiness
    2) Language and meaning/findings one’s voice
    • Language and speaking gives a person status and membership in a community.
    3) Race and Racism
    • Class differences within the African-American community
    4) The Journey
    • Discover the Journey of the main character
    Symbols: (annotate these when you see them)
     
    1. Nature: pear tree, sun, hurricane, etc.
    2. Clothing and hair: represents a quest for identity/individuality
    3. Gateways: the need for freedom
    4. Porches: gathering and community
    Important note: While it is convenient to separate these factors into the categories listed here, it is important to remember that they overlap and are all intricately connected.

    Figurative Language and Literary Devices:
    Figurative language in literature is not simply decorative or fancy writing. It connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way.

    Describe/define the following devices and find two examples of each in the text:
    • Metaphor
    • Simile
    • Personification
    • Imagery
    For the Choice book, you will annotate and create a graphic organizer. Focus on themes, figurative language, literary devices, characters, symbols, and any other information that you find valuable in helping you better understand the novel. You must have more than 30 annotations that span the entire novel.
     
    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.
     
    Choose One other
    ISBN: 978-1565129757 How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents Julia Alvarez
    ISBN: 978-0394759883Shrapnel in the Heart: Letters and Remembrances from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial by Laura Palmer
    ISBN: 978-0375702709A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest Gaines

    Helpful Videos for Annotating:

    If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating

    Assessment
    : For Required and Choice
    Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
    • Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.
  • 12th Grade World Literature 404

    Annotations and Quotation Analysis for One Hundred Years of Solitude
    (Summer Reading- World Literature 404 - Grade 12)

    Directions: Make annotations for One Hundred Years of Solitude based on the following categories:

    World Literature 404
    : must have at least three (3) annotations for each category and a total of 20 that span the entire novel. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.

    FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

    1) Family
    • births, deaths, marriages, love, connections / bonds / ties to each other
     
    2) Isolation
    • How is the community /the individual within the community isolated?
     
    3) Connection to Outside World
    • Note the connections to outside world as time / generations pass
     
    4) Modernization / Capitalism / Progress
    • Effects of progress on the community / individuals
     
    5) Realism vs Magic (Magical Realism)
    • Examples are poverty (a reality) and the mention of gypsies, myths and legends (belief in the magical).
     
    6) Your insights on why or how this element affects the story.
     
    7) Figurative Language and Literary Devices
      • Figurative language in literature connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way. There are plenty of examples in the book.
      • Metaphor
      • Simile
      • Personification
      • Imagery
      Helpful Videos for Annotating:

      If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating

      Assessment
      :
      Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
      • Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.
    1. 12th Grade World Literature 454

      Annotations and Quotation Analysis for One Hundred Years of Solitude
      (Summer Reading- World Literature 454 - Grade 12)

      Students in this class are required to read 2 novels and complete annotations and graphic organizers for both. Specific directions for each novel are listed below.

      FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

      Directions
      : Make annotations for One Hundred Years of Solitude based on the following categories:

      World Literature 454 
      must have at least five (5) annotations for each category and a total of 35 that span the entire novel. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.

      FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

      1) Family
      • births, deaths, marriages, love, connections / bonds / ties to each other
       
      2) Isolation
      • How is the community /the individual within the community isolated
       3) Connection to Outside World
      • Note the connections to outside world as time / generations pass
       
      4) Modernization / Capitalism / Progress
      • Effects of progress on the community / individuals
       
      5) Realism vs Magic (Magical Realism)
      • Examples are poverty (a reality) and the mention of gypsies, myths and legends (belief in the magical)
       
      6) Your insights on why or how this element affects the story.

      7) Figurative Language and Literary Devices
        • Figurative language in literature connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way. There are plenty of examples in the book.
        • Metaphor
        • Simile
        • Personification
        • Imagery
        For the Choice book, you will annotate and create a graphic organizer. Focus on themes, figurative language, literary devices, characters, symbols, and any other information that you find valuable in helping you better understand the novel. You must have more than 30 annotations that span the entire novel.

        FOR ANNOTATIONS, YOU MAY USE A NOTEBOOK OR COMPOSITION BOOK IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO MARK-UP YOUR NOVEL.

        Choose One other
        ISBN 9781401944322 Left to Tell by Immaculee Ilibagiza
        ISBN 978-0743243780 Teacher Man by Frank McCourt
        ISBN 978-0375507250 Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell

        Helpful Videos for Annotating:

        If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating

        Assessment
        :
        Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
        Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.
      1. 12th Grade Contemporary Literature

        Annotations for To Kill a Mockingbird and The Grapes of Wrath
        (Summer Reading- Contemporary Literature )

        Directions: Make annotations for BOTH novels based on the following categories:
        You: must have at least three (3) annotations for each category. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide

        1 Family
        -Grapes of Wrath: two “families” – the Joads and the migrant workers
        -similarities/differences/ loyalty and commitment
        -Mockingbird – strength of family / coming of age

        2 Dignity /Morality
        -keeping one’s dignity / fighting for the dignity of others

        3 Prejudice /Racism
        -loss of innocence / class distinction / equality and justice in America

        4 The Great Depression era
        -how reflected in both novels

        5 Figurative Language and Literary Devices: Figurative language in literature connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way. There are plenty of examples in the book
        .
        * Metaphor
        * Simile
        * Personification
        * Imagery

        Helpful Videos for Annotating:

        If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating
         
        Assessment:
        Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
        • Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.
      2. 12th Grade Writing & Literature for the College Bound Senior 404

        Annotations and Quotation Analysis for
        Writing & Literature for the College Bound Senior
         
        Writing & Literature for the College Bound Senior 404 - PART ONE

        Read the following articles:
        must have at least twelve (12) annotations per article/short story. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.
         
        After reading and annotating the above texts, complete the following:

        BACKPACKS VS. BRIEFCASES: Discussion Questions
        Answer the following questions in a notebook or binder. All answers MUST be handwritten and AT LEAST 100 words each: (Note: the page numbers below refer to the page numbers on the document)
         
        1. What are the implications of rhetorical analysis? (p. 46)
        2. What is the “rhetorical situation”? (p. 48)
        3. What is the argument in rhetorical analysis? (p. 52)
        4. What does context have to do with Rhetorical Analysis? (p.55)
        5. Why is rhetorical analysis important in college? (p.57)
        6. What are examples of rhetoric that you see and hear on a daily basis?
        7. What are some ways that you create rhetoric?
         
        INVENTING THE UNIVERSTITY: Discussion Questions
        Answer the following questions in a notebook or binder. All answers MUST be handwritten and AT LEAST 100 words each:
         
        1. How do student writers write?
        2. What makes “basic” writing basic?
        3. What makes “successful” writing successful?
        4. What’s wrong with the traditional curricula designed to prepare basic writers?
        5. How can basic writers learn to improve?
        6. What is writing for? (What does Bartholomae seem to think the end goal of writing should be?)
         
         Writing & Literature for the College Bound Senior 404 – PART TWO
        Read the following short stories: For the short stories, you must have at least five (5) annotations for each category. For some, you will have more. You will also complete the Graphic Organizer using your annotations as a guide.
        1) Marriage
        • How does Hemingway view marriage? Where is this evident in his writing?
        2) Mountains/Hills/Getting Over It
        • Symbolism of mountains, climbing, etc.
        3) Death
        • Acceptance of death, regret, etc.
        4) Fear
        • Fear-driven plots, fear of death, fear of commitment, fear of failure, etc.
        5) Hemingway’s “Iceberg Theory”
        • Hemingway is considered a “minimalist” writer, only including the most basic, non-descriptive language in his writing. Think about how this writing style contributes to his stories. What is the value in only providing the reader with the tip of the iceberg?
        6) Your insights on why or how this element affects the story.

        7) Figurative Language and Literary Devices

        • Figurative language in literature connects language to real life and the physical world. It allows us to see both objects compared in a new light. It allows us to understand abstract ideas in a tangible way.
          • Metaphor
          • Simile
          • Imagery

        Helpful Videos for Annotating:
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YajFNCYsGPY
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0dhD19I6io8
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNr-E8g35nI

        If these do not help, search Youtube.com for additional videos about Annotating 
         
        Assessment:
        Annotations taken on summer reading title needs to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
        • Graphic Organizers must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions. You must bring your Graphic Organizers completed to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete. Remember all quotes will come from your annotations.
      3. Brookdale English 121

         
        ENGL 121: The Writing Process
        Summer Reading: 2018
         
        All students taking English 121 are required to read:
         
        On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King
         
        “You learn best by reading a lot and writing a lot, and the most valuable lessons of all are the ones you teach yourself.” - Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
         
        This book can help develop your writing skills (and hopefully your passion for both reading and writing). As King states, “Some of this book—perhaps too much—has been about how I learned to do it. Much of it has been about how you can do it better. The rest of it—and perhaps the best of it—is a permission slip: you can, you should, and if you're brave enough to start, you will. Writing is magic, as much the water of life as any other creative art. The water is free. So drink. Drink and be filled up. ”
         
        This book is divided into four sections: C.V., Toolbox, On Writing and On Living: A Postscript. Your assignment will, likewise, be divided into four sections. For each assignment below, please include the page numbers for the passages.
         
        *ALL OF THESE ASSIGNMENTS MUST BE TYPED IN TIMES NEW ROMAN, 12PT FONT, WITH 1” JUSTIFIED MARGINS. TASKS
         
        HAND-WRITTEN SUBMISSIONS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED (TYPED ASSIGNMENTS ARE EXPECTATION FOR HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH COURSES).
         
        *THE ASSIGNMENTS BELOW, AS WELL AS THE DISCUSSION OF THESE ASSIGNMENTS, WILL BE A MAJOR PART OF YOUR GRADE FOR THE FIRST TWO WEEKS OF SCHOOL.
         
        Get an early start and make sure you devise a reading and writing plan that will allow you to complete the assigned reading and tasks before school begins. (time management is another extremely imperative life skill that needs to be developed).
         
        Do not substitute Cliffs Notes, Spark Notes, or other summaries or condensations of this text. If you choose to plagiarize, you will receive a zero for these assignments. I have no problem with you discussing the reading and assignments with other students; however all written assignments should be your original work. All work will be submitted through BlackBaud by the first week in September, 2018.
         
        Required Assignments Tasks 1-4 and then choose either Task 5 or 6:
         
        (Assignments that are incomplete will not be considered for grading)
         
        Task #1: C.V.
         
        This is a non-fiction (true) text, but it often reads like a novel/piece of fiction. To tell his story, King uses literary elements and techniques (i.e. imagery, dialogue, figurative language, Freytag’s structure) which we often associate with fictional pieces. Identify 2 passages in C.V. in which King uses such elements/techniques effectively. Explain the elements/techniques he uses and why they are effective.
         
        Task #2 Toolbox
         
        Create a writer’s toolbox for yourself to use throughout the year. Identify 7 rules of writing that King discusses (include page number) which you think are important or interesting. As you select them, think about your own strengths and weaknesses as a writer. Please number your selections 1-7. Then add an additional 3 rules of writing which you have either practiced or been taught throughout your school career. Example: Don’t begin a sentence with “and.”
         
        Task #3 On Writing
         
        How does King feel about writing? How do you know? Choose two key passages from this section in which King defines writing, either directly or figuratively (remember to include page numbers). In your own words, restate King’s point about writing in the passage and why you think this point is interesting or important.
         
        Task #4 On Living: A Postscript
         
        This task does not pertain to just this section of the book. Rather, explain your opinion of King as both a writer and a person. Would you consider reading one of his books now, for example? (If you have read his books prior to this assignment, has your opinion of King changed? If so, how?) What do you think King’s purpose was in writing this book? Support your answers to both prompts with evidence from the text.
         
         
        Choose Either Task 5 or 6
         
        Task #5
         
        Choose your favorite quote from this novel and create a graphic/picture to accompany the quote – get creative! Then write a short constructed response (10 sentences or less) explaining why it is your favorite quote, how the graphic represents the quote, and how the quote applies to your life. The short constructed response should include a claim, evidence and analysis.
         
        Or
         
        Task #6 –
         
        Reflect on your past experiences as a reader and as a writer and compose a one page memoir, like King’s, that provides insight into your personal history. Try to elaborate on the experiences that have had a lasting impact on your development as a reader and a writer, and how they have shaped you into the literary person you are today. Allow King to inspire you with his first 99 pages of On Writing. Take a chance. Be bold. Impress….
      4. Brookdale English 155 & 158

        Summer Assignment for ENGL 155 and 158
        How to Read Literature Like a Professor
         
        It is important that you begin to read literature like a true literary scholar. Thomas Foster’s guide is a staple in the college literature classroom. This “How-to” book will better prepare you to read carefully and analytically as you begin your year as an advanced English student. Having knowledge of the subjects covered in this text will give you an advantage throughout the school year in both this class and other classes. I do not expect essay responses for each question. As long as you satisfactorily answer the questions, length will not be an issue. These writings will be somewhat informal and you can use outside books, films, and television series for your examples. These reflections will be submitted through Blackbaud and you need to be ready for discussion the first week of class.
         
        All work will be printed and submitted through Blackbaud during the first week of school.
        This link can be used to access a PDF of the book: How to Read Literature Like a Professor
         
        Each chapter is listed here for you with their own unique questions/prompts to guide your annotations. Follow each one carefully and answer completely (approximately 1 paragraph for each chapter).

        If you are enrolled in the AP Literature and Composition class and ENGL 155 or ENGL 158, you do not have to do this twice. You are still responsible for completing all the AP Literature work, but you can submit this for the Brookdale classes.

        If you are taking both ENGL 155 and 158, you can hand in this for both classes.

        Introduction: How’d He Do That? How do memory, symbol, and pattern affect the reading of literature? How does the recognition of patterns make it easier to read complicated literature? Discuss a time when your appreciation of a literary work was enhanced by understanding symbol or pattern.

        Chapter 1 -- Every Trip Is a Quest (Except When It’s Not) List the five aspects of the QUEST and then apply them to something you have read (or viewed) in the form used on pages 4-5.

        Chapter 2 -- Nice to Eat with You: Acts of Communion Choose a meal from a literary work and apply the ideas of Chapter 2 to this literary depiction.

        Chapter 3: --Nice to Eat You: Acts of Vampires What are the essentials of the Vampire story? Apply this to a literary work you have read or viewed.

        Chapter 4 -- Now, Where Have I Seen Her Before? Define intertextuality. Discuss three examples that have helped you in reading specific works.

        Chapter 5 -- When in Doubt, It’s from Shakespeare... Discuss a work that you are familiar with that alludes to or reflects Shakespeare. Show how the author uses this connection thematically. Read pages 44-46 carefully. In these pages, Foster shows how Fugard reflects Shakespeare through both plot and theme. In your discussion, focus on theme.

        Chapter 6 -- Or the Bible Pick a Novel or story that you have read in the past. Discuss Biblical allusions that Foster mentions in this chapter. Also, find Biblical allusions that he does not mention. Look at the example of the “two great jars.” Be creative and imaginative in these connections.

        Chapter 7 -- Hanseldee and Greteldum Think of a work of literature (including film) that reflects a fairy tale. Discuss the parallels. Does it create irony or deepen appreciation?

        Chapter 8 -- It’s Greek to Me: Just Read

        Chapter 9 -- It’s More Than Just Rain or Snow Discuss the importance of weather in a specific literary work, not in terms of plot.

        Chapter 10 -- Never Stand Next to the Hero Explain the difference between round and flat characters. Give three examples in literature or in a movie where the title of this chapter applies and how.

        Interlude -- Does He Mean That

        Chapter 11 -- More Than It’s Gonna Hurt You: Concerning Violence Present examples of the two kinds of violence found in literature (including film). Show how the effects are different.

        Chapter 12 -- Is That a Symbol? Use the process described on page 113 and investigate the symbolism of the fence in “Araby.” (Mangan’s sister stands behind it.)

        Chapter 13 -- It’s All Political Assume that Foster is right and “it is all political.” Use his criteria to show that one of the major works assigned to you in a previuous year is political.

        Chapter 14 -- Yes, She’s a Christ Figure, Too Apply the criteria on page 126-129 to a major character in a significant literary work. Try to choose a character that will have many matches. This is a particularly apt tool for analyzing film -- for example, Star Wars, Cool Hand Luke, Excalibur, Malcolm X, Braveheart, Spartacus, Gladiator and Ben-Hur.

        Chapter 15 -- Flights of Fancy Select a literary work in which flight signifies escape or freedom. Explain in detail.

        Chapter 16 -- It’s All About Sex: Just Read

        Chapter 17 -- Except the Sex: Just Read

        Chapter 18 -- If She Comes Up, It’s Baptism Think of a “baptism scene” from a significant literary work. How was the character different after the experience? Discuss.


        Chapter 19 -- Geography Matters... Discuss at least four different aspects of a specific literary work that Foster would classify under “geography.”

        Chapter 20 -- So Does Season Find a poem that mentions a specific season. Then discuss how the poet uses the season in a meaningful, traditional, or unusual way. (Submit a copy of the poem with your analysis.)

        Interlude -- One Story Write your own definition for archetype. Then identify an archetypal story and apply it to a literary work with which you are familiar.

        Chapter 21 -- Marked for Greatness Why do authors give characters in literature deformities? Figure out Harry Potter’s scar. If you aren’t familiar with Harry Potter, select another character with a physical imperfection and analyze its implications for characterization.

        Chapter 22 -- He’s Blind for a Reason, You Know If it is difficult to write a story with a blind character, why might an author include one? Explain what Foster calls the “Indiana Jones Principle.”

        Chapter 23 -- It’s Never Just Heart Disease... Why does Foster consider heart disease the best, most lyrical, most perfectly metaphorical illness? Recall two characters who died of a disease in a literary work. Consider how these deaths reflect the “principles governing the use of disease in literature” (215-217). Discuss the effectiveness of the death as related to plot, theme, or symbolism.

        Chapter 24 -- Don’t Read with Your Eyes After reading Chapter 24, choose a scene or episode from a novel, play or epic written before the twentieth century. Contrast how it could be viewed by a reader from the twenty-first century with how it might be viewed by a contemporary reader. Focus on specific assumptions that the author makes, assumptions that would not make it in this century.

        Chapter 25 -- It’s My Symbol and I’ll Cry if I Want to Discuss a poet or author who uses an odd word/phrase that might be over-looked for its symbolic meaning. Give some explanation here – both of the author and of the work/s in which the symbol appears.

        Chapter 26 -- Is He Serious? And Other Ironies Select an ironic literary work and explain the multivocal nature of the irony in the work.

        Chapter 27 -- A Test Case Read “The Garden Party” by Katherine Mansfield, the short story starting on page 262. Complete the exercise on pages 282-283, following the directions exactly. Then compare your writing with the three examples. How did you do? What does the essay that follows comparing Laura with Persephone add to your appreciation of Mansfield’s story?

        Envoi: Just Read
      5. AP Literature and Composition

        Annotations and Quotation Analysis for
        How to Read Literature Like a Professor and The Alchemist
        (Summer Reading- AP Literature in THREE PARTS)

        PART ONE:

        Directions
        : Make annotations for How to Read Literature Like a Professor based on the following categories:

        AP Literature –
        Your annotations should be organized by chapter. Each chapter is listed here for you with their own unique questions/prompts to guide your annotations. Follow each one carefully and answer completely (approximately 1 paragraph for each chapter).

        Introduction: How’d He Do That?

        How do memory, symbol, and pattern affect the reading of literature? How does the recognition of patterns make it easier to read complicated literature? Discuss a time when your appreciation of a literary work was enhanced by understanding symbol or pattern.

        Chapter 1 -- Every Trip Is a Quest (Except When It’s Not)

        List the five aspects of the QUEST and then apply them to something you have read (or viewed) in the form used on pages 4-5.

        Chapter 2 -- Nice to Eat with You: Acts of Communion

        Choose a meal from a literary work and apply the ideas of Chapter 2 to this literary depiction.

        Chapter 3: --Nice to Eat You: Acts of Vampires

        What are the essentials of the Vampire story? Apply this to a literary work you have read or viewed.

        Chapter 4 -- Now, Where Have I Seen Her Before?

        Define intertextuality. Discuss three examples that have helped you in reading specific works.

        Chapter 5 -- When in Doubt, It’s from Shakespeare...

        Discuss a work that you are familiar with that alludes to or reflects Shakespeare. Show how the author uses this connection thematically. Read pages 44-46 carefully. In these pages, Foster shows how Fugard reflects Shakespeare through both plot and theme. In your discussion, focus on theme.

        Chapter 6 -- ...Or the Bible

        Read “Araby” here . Then, discuss Biblical allusions that Foster does not mention. Look at the example of the “two great jars.” Be creative and imaginative in these connections.

        Chapter 7 -- Hanseldee and Greteldum

        Think of a work of literature (including film) that reflects a fairy tale. Discuss the parallels. Does it create irony or deepen appreciation?

        Chapter 8 -- It’s Greek to Me

        Write a free verse poem derived or inspired by characters or situations from Greek mythology. Be prepared to share your poem with the class. Greek mythology available online.

        Chapter 9 -- It’s More Than Just Rain or Snow

        Discuss the importance of weather in a specific literary work, not in terms of plot.

        Chapter 10 -- Never Stand Next to the Hero

        Explain the difference between round and flat characters. Give three examples in literature or in a movie where the title of this chapter applies and how.

        Interlude -- Does He Mean That

        Chapter 11 --...More Than It’s Gonna Hurt You: Concerning Violence

        Present examples of the two kinds of violence found in literature (including film). Show how the effects are different.

        Chapter 12 -- Is That a Symbol?

        Use the process described on page 113 and investigate the symbolism of the fence in “Araby.” (Mangan’s sister stands behind it.)

        Chapter 13 -- It’s All Political

        Assume that Foster is right and “it is all political.” Use his criteria to show that one of the major works assigned to you in a previuous year is political.

        Chapter 14 -- Yes, She’s a Christ Figure, Too

        Apply the criteria on page 126-129 to a major character in a significant literary work. Try to choose a character that will have many matches. This is a particularly apt tool for analyzing film -- for example, Star Wars, Cool Hand Luke, Excalibur, Malcolm X, Braveheart, Spartacus, Gladiato,r and Ben-Hur.

        Chapter 15 -- Flights of Fancy

        Select a literary work in which flight signifies escape or freedom. Explain in detail.

        Chapter 16 -- It’s All About Sex...

        Chapter 17 -- ...Except the Sex

        The key idea from this chapter is that “scenes in which sex is coded rather than explicit can work at multiple levels and sometimes be more intense that literal depictions” (149). In other words, sex is often suggested with much more art and effort than it is described, and, if the author is doing his job, it reflects and creates theme or character. In a MATURE and ACADEMIC fashion, choose a novel or movie in which sex is suggested, but not described, and discuss how the relationship is suggested and how this implication affects the theme or develops characterization.

        Chapter 18 -- If She Comes Up, It’s Baptism

        Think of a “baptism scene” from a significant literary work. How was the character different after the experience? Discuss.

        Chapter 19 -- Geography Matters...

        Discuss at least four different aspects of a specific literary work that Foster would classify under “geography.”

        Chapter 20 -- ...So Does Season
        Find a poem that mentions a specific season. Then discuss how the poet uses the season in a meaningful, traditional, or unusual way. (Submit a copy of the poem with your analysis.)

        Interlude -- One Story

        Write your own definition for archetype. Then identify an archetypal story and apply it to a literary work with which you are familiar.

        Chapter 21 -- Marked for Greatness

        Why do authors give characters in literature deformities? Figure out Harry Potter’s scar. If you aren’t familiar with Harry Potter, select another character with a physical imperfection and analyze its implications for characterization.

        Chapter 22 -- He’s Blind for a Reason, You Know
        If it is difficult to write a story with a blind character, why might an author include one? Explain what Foster calls the “Indiana Jones Principle.”

        Chapter 23 -- It’s Never Just Heart Disease...

        Why does Foster consider heart disease the best, most lyrical, most perfectly metaphorical illness? Recall two characters who died of a disease in a literary work. Consider how these deaths reflect the “principles governing the use of disease in literature” (215-217). Discuss the effectiveness of the death as related to plot, theme, or symbolism.

        Chapter 24 -- Don’t Read with Your Eyes
        After reading Chapter 24, choose a scene or episode from a novel, play or epic written before the twentieth century. Contrast how it could be viewed by a reader from the twenty-first century with how it might be viewed by a contemporary reader. Focus on specific assumptions that the author makes, assumptions that would not make it in this century.

        Chapter 25 -- It’s My Symbol and I’ll Cry if I Want to

        Discuss a poet or author who uses an odd word/phrase that might be over-looked for its symbolic meaning. Give some explanation here – both of the author and of the work/s in which the symbol appears.

        Chapter 26 -- Is He Serious? And Other Ironies

        Select an ironic literary work and explain the multivocal nature of the irony in the work.

        Chapter 27 -- A Test Case

        Read “The Garden Party” by Katherine Mansfield, the short story starting on page 262. Complete the exercise on pages 282-283, following the directions exactly. Then compare your writing with the three examples. How did you do? What does the essay that follows comparing Laura with Persephone add to your appreciation of Mansfield’s story?

        Envoi

        Choose a motif not discussed in this book (as the horse reference on page 304) and note its appearance in three or four different works. What does this idea seem to signify?
         
         PART TWO:
        Directions: Choose and answer THREE of the six prompts below, and apply your understanding of select themes from How to Read Literature Like a Professor (HtRLLaP) to the themes and elements in The Alchemist. Each response should be handwritten and approximately 250 – 400 words in length.
         
        1) HtRLLaP Chapter 1 – “Every Trip Is a Quest (Except When It’s Not)”
        • Apply the five aspects of The Quest to the narrator’s journeys in The Alchemist. You may choose to focus on any single aspect of his movement, or look at the entirety of his journey as his quest.
         
        2) HtRLLaP Chapter 7 – “…Or the Bible”
        • Choose a scene or symbol in The Alchemist that you believe is a biblical reference and describe/compare the similarities in detail.
         
        3) HtRLLaP Chapter 10 – “It’s More Than Just Rain or Snow”

        • According to Foster, “…weather is never just weather. It’s never just rain” (44). Discuss at least THREE different aspects of weather in The Alchemist and how they are used to develop plot, mood, etc.
         
        4) HtRLLaP Chapter 12 – “Is That a Symbol?”

        • Using Foster’s process of deciphering symbols, investigate the symbolism Coelho uses in The Alchemist.
        • Focus on two or three symbols and give a detailed analysis of each.
         
        5) HtRLLaP Chapter 19 – “Geography Matters…”
        • Discuss at least FOUR different aspects of geography in The Alchemist and how they impact the themes and events of the novel. (Note: Foster’s definition of “geography” is very broad; take this into consideration when developing your response.)
         6) HtRLLaP Chapter 25 – “Don’t Read with Your Eyes”
        • Choose a scene and discuss the importance of understanding it from the perspective of the time in which the novel is set. What assumptions does the author make that would not necessarily be assumptions of a reader from 2017?
        PART THREE:

        Poetry:
        Read/review the graphic organizer below on HOW to analyze a poem. Then, use the following blank graphic organizer to analyze the poem “Eating Poetry” by Mark Strand (attached).

        TPCASTT:
        Title, Paraphrase, Connotation, Attitude, Shift, Title, Theme
        Literary Analysis Made Easy
         
        T- Title: Think about the title, and draw some conclusions as to its meaning before reading the poem
        P- Paraphrase: Translate the poem into your own words (literal and denotation) For short poems, paraphrase line by line. For longer poems, summarize stanza by stanza. [Reminder: Watch for syntactical units (complete sentences) rather than line by line. Complete thoughts will end with punctuation.]
        C- Connotation: Examine the meaning beyond the literal. Observe any and all devices, focusing on how each device contributes to the meaning and/or the effect.
        A - Attitude/Tone: Examine both the speaker’s and the poet’s attitudes.

        Look for:
         
        1.Speaker’s attitude toward him/herself, other characters, and the subject of the poem
        2.Attitudes of characters other than the poem’s speaker
        3.Poet’s attitude toward speaker, other characters, subject, and finally, toward the reader
         
        S - Shift: It is very seldom that a poem ends in the same figurative “place” it began. Poetry is a writer’s reflection of their “a-ha!” moment, and their understanding of the experience. Typically, this realization does not happen overnight, but progresses slowly. One way to help arrive at an understanding of a poem is to trace the changing feelings of the speaker from the beginning to the end. The discovery of the shift can be facilitated by watching for the following:
         
        ✓          Key words: but, yet, however, although
         
        ✓          Punctuation: dashes, periods, colons, ellipsis
         
        ✓          Changes in line or stanza length
         
        ✓          Irony
         
        ✓          Changes in sound that may indicate changes in meaning
         
        ✓          Changes in diction: slang to formal
         
        ✓          Occasion of poem (time and place)
         
        ✓          Stanza divisions

        T                   - Title: Now that you’ve read the poem, re-examine the title and draw new conclusions.
         
        T - Theme: Recognize the human experience, motivation, or condition suggested by the poem. First list what the poem is about (subjects); then determine what the poet is saying about each of those subjects (theme). Remember, the theme must be expressed as a complete sentence.
         
        ***REMINDER: Always show how poetic devices operate in conveying the effect and meaning of the passage or poem. Like any good argument, you must always support your claims with evidence: cite specific details from the text and explain them accurately!***
         
        YOU WILL BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR KNOWING THE MEANING AND USES OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING POETIC DEVICES:
        Alliteration
        A repetition of identical or similar consonant sounds, typically at the beginning of words
        Allusions
        A direct or indirect reference to something that is presumed to be common knowledge (ie. a well-
         
        known book, play, event, myth, etc.)
        Ambiguity
        Unclear or double meanings
        Antithesis
        Direct contrast of structurally parallel word groupings (ie. up – down, near – far, best – worst, etc.)
        Apostrophe
        Speaker directs remarks to an absent/dead person, or non-human object
        Assonance
        Repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds – “The rain in Spain falls mainly in the plains.”
        Consonance
        Repetition of the same or similar final consonant sound on accented syllables or in important words
         
        (ie. ticktock, singsong)
        Details
        Facts included or omitted to create effect or evoke response
        Diction
        Choice of words (denotative and connotative meanings)
        Hyperbole
        Exaggerated statements (ie. I’m so hungry, I could eat a horse!)
        Imagery/Images
        Sensory details: visual, auditory, smell, touch, taste
        Internal Rhyme
        Repetition of sounds within the same line
        Irony
        Opposite of the expected: verbal, situational, dramatic
        Metaphor
        Direct comparison of a principal term identified by a secondary term: “Chaos is a friend of mine.” –
         
        Bob Dylan
        Metonymy
        Object is used to represent something to which it is closely related: “The pen (written word) is
         
        mightier than the sword (military force).”
        Onomatopoeia
        Use of a word whose sound imitates or suggests its meaning
        Oxymoron
        Contradiction of terms (ie. jumbo shrimp, the sound of silence, pretty ugly)
        Paradox
        Appears contradictory or opposed to common sense, but contains a degree of truth or validity
        Personification
        Author presents or describes concepts, animals, or inanimate objects by giving them human
         
        attributes or emotions
        Pun
        A play on words - “Pencils could be made with erasers at both ends, but what would be the point?”
        Rhyme
        The repetition of vowel sounds in accented syllables and all succeeding syllables
        Simile
        A comparison using “like” or “as”
        Symbols
        Anything that represents or stands for something else
        Syntax
        The arrangement of words within sentences or of sentences within a paragraph
        Synecdoche
        A part that represents the whole (ie. “Check out my new set of wheels!” – Wheels represent the
         
        whole car.)
        Understatement
        Ironic minimalizing of fact: understatement presents something as less significant than it is
         
         
        TPCASTT:
        Title, Paraphrase, Connotation, Attitude, Shift, Title, Theme
        Literary Analysis Made Easy
         
         
        T
        Title:
        Consider the title and make a prediction about what the poem is about.
         
        P
        Paraphrase: Translate the poem line by line into your own words on a literal level. Look for complete thoughts (sentences may be inverted) and look up unfamiliar words.
         
        C
        Connotation: Examine the poem for meaning beyond the literal. Look for figurative language, imagery, and sound elements.
         
        A
        Attitude/Tone: Notice the speaker’s tone and attitude. Humor? Sarcasm? Awe? Anger? Etc.
         
        S
        Shifts: Notice any shifts or changes in speaker or attitude. Look for key words, time change, punctuation.
         
        T
        Title: Examine the title again, this time on an interpretive level.
         
        T
        Theme: Briefly state in your own words what the poem is about (subject), then what the poet is saying about the subject.
         

         
        Directions: Analyze this poem line by line using the TPCASTT chart. You will be expected to turn in a completed handwritten chart to receive credit for this portion of the assignment. If you need extra space, you may print a second page and/or use white-lined paper to continue writing that section. If you choose to use white-lined paper, please clearly label/indicate what section you are continuing.

        Eating Poetry
         
        Ink runs from the corners of my mouth.
         
        There is no happiness like mine.
        I have been eating poetry.
         
        The librarian does not believe what she sees.
        Her eyes are sad
        and she walks with her hands in her dress.
         
        The poems are gone.
        The light is dim.
        The dogs are on the basement stairs and coming up.
         
        Their eyeballs roll,
         
        their blond legs burn like brush.
        The poor librarian begins to stamp her feet and weep.
         
        She does not understand.
        When I get on my knees and lick her hand,
        she screams.
         
        I am a new man.
        I snarl at her and bark.
        I romp with joy in the bookish dark.
         
         
        Assessment:
        Annotations taken on summer reading title need to be readily accessible for class discussions and composition; therefore, students must bring their completed annotations to class on the first day of class and each day until the summer reading unit is complete.  
        • Due to the nature and length of these specific annotations, please write them in a notebook or on loose-leaf paper instead of utilizing the graphic organizer. Your responses must be printed or hand written and available for class discussions and compositions.

      Mater Dei Prep

      Mater Dei Prep

      538 Church Street, Middletown, NJ 07748
      Phone 732-671-9100  Fax 732-671-9214

      Mater Dei Prep admits students of any race, color, religion, and national or ethnic origin.
      © 2015-16 Mater Dei Prep